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Module description

Accounting

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business Administration.

Teaching methods Lecture/seminar
Learning target

Knowledge of tools and methods of Internal and External Accounting

Ability to implement the achieved knowledge in

  • consulting projects in Accounting
  • consulting projects (which are not related to Accounting) in  which the tools of this module are used (representative for many project contents: Turnaround Management consulting, Logistics consulting).
Duration 1 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:105 h

  • Workload:150 h
Credits and grades

Written examination (90 min).

The module grade is factored in 6/90 in the final grade.

ECTS 5.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1
Frequency Annually (ws)
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management" as well as for general business or industrial engineering master programs of other universities (in Germany and abroad).

Lectures Cost Management
Type Lecture
Nr. IBC-03-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

A) Managerial Accounting Systems
Development of the reference model of Costing:
Costing processes measure the value consumption and value creation of business processes. This is organized in the different costing areas:
• Cost element accounting
• Cost center accounting (overhead costing)
• Product costing
• Profitability accounting

Methods applied in these areas depend on the industry branch which a company belongs to.
The training in these methods is based on case studies and supported by software tools (Ms-Office, SAP ERP®).

B) Traditional Costing vs. Cost Management
Discussion of the weaknesses of traditional actual costing, definition of Cost Management as a target-oriented costing approach.

Literature

Horngren, Foster, Datar, Cost Accounting - a managerial emphasis, Prentice-Hall 2000.

Horngren, Bhimani, Datar, Foster, Management and Cost Accounting, Prentice-Hall 2005.

Brock, Herrington, Cost accounting - principles and applications, McGraw-Hill 2006.

Blocher, Chen, Lin, Cost Management - a strategic emphasis, McGraw Hill 2000.

Larson, Wild, Chiappetta, Fundamental Accounting Principles, McGraw Hill 1999.

Kimmel, Weygandt, Kieso, Principles of accounting, John Wiley 2005.

Financial Accounting and Reporting I
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-03-02
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

A fundamental understanding of Financial Accounting, Annual Reports and International Financial Reporting Standrads and the ability to interpret them nowadays is a matter of course for every manager. To be able to adequately interpret Annual Reports and to make decisions on the data, it is necessary to understand the underlying accounting techniques, rules and regulations. As the IFRSs have reached global acceptance in recent years, an insight into the rules is a must in management education.

Financial Accounting procedures and the Financial Reporting instruments under IFRS as well as the implications of the above-mentioned rules are explained and discussed in case studies. Interrelations between the Reporting instruments under IFRS are explained and made obvious for the students. Furthermore, published financial statements of publicly listed companies that are generated in line with International Financial Reporting Standards are analyzed. The students also will create their own Financial Statements based on accounting transactions and case studies to build up a general understanding of Financial Accounting and Reporting.

All teaching subjects will be supported by in-class case studies and additional, advanced homework case studies. All case studies come along with sample solutions and will be discussed in-class.

To improve the student's presentation skills, selected Rules and Case-studies will be solved in student-teams. Additional reading is required as basis to solve advanced case studies and to apply the learned topics. The respective results will be presented to the other students and the instructor. To also improve in-class understanding and progress the students will be instructed for pre-reading, self-study after every in-class lecture and the pre-reading is required and helpful for succeeding lessons.

 

Goals:

Soft Skills:

  • Improve diversity, in particular by working in international, multi-ethnic teams to achieve measurable results
  • Improve presentation skills by repeatedly presenting the results of group assignments.
  •  Improve self-study ability. 

Hard Skills:

  • Achieving a general understanding of Financial Accounting, the accounting equation, the double entry bookkeeping system and the interrelations between internal and external Accounting.
  • Ability to prepare, read, analyse and interpret the 3 basic financial statements (Balance sheet, Income Statement and Statement of Cashflows).
  • Achieving a deeper insight into Financial Accounting, International Financial Reporting Standards and the presentation of Financial Statements.
  • Acquiring the qualification to evaluate the imoact of the strategic decision making on the fiscal year statement.
Literature

In-class materials, handouts and script.

Annual Reports.


Advanced Accounting

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business Administration.

Teaching methods Lecture
Learning target

A)  Standard Costing/Flexible Budget (StCo/FlexBud)

Development of the reference model of the StCo/FlexBud system (based on the weaknesses of actual full absorption costing):

  Implementation steps of a StC/FlexB system:

  • Planning activities
  • Analysis activities

  for the different costing areas:

  • Cost element accounting
  • Cost center accounting (overhead costing)
  • Product costing
  • Profitability accounting

The training in these methods is based on case studies and supported by software tools (Ms-Office, SAP ERP®).

B)   Activity Based Costing (ABC)

Discussion of reasons for the upcoming of ABC (weaknesses of the surcharge allocation method, importance of indirect costs, ...).Main process steps of Activity Based Costing (ABC) are  described, such as: definition of concepts, built-up of ABC, interpretation of ABC-based results, how to built-up  product costing based on activity costs, ABC-method as a base of an encompassing business process optimization.

Goals:

  • Acquiring the skills to apply costing methods in particular cases
  • Understanding this methods as useful instruments for the controlling of costs in different functional areas
Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:105 h

  • Workload:150 h
Credits and grades

Written exam of 90 minutes.

The module grade is factored in 6/90 in the final grade.

ECTS 5.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Advanced Accounting
Type Lecture
Nr. IBC-04-01
Hours per week 4.0
Literature

Horngren, Foster, Datar, Cost Accounting - a managerial emphasis, Prentice-Hall 2000.

Horngren, Bhimani, Datar, Foster, Management and Cost Accounting, Prentice-Hall 2005.

Brock, Herrington, Cost accounting - principles and applications, McGraw-Hill 2006.

Blocher, Chen, Lin, Cost Management - a strategic emphasis, McGraw Hill 2000.

Cooper, R., Kaplan, R.S., The design of cost management systems, Prentice-Hall 1999.

Kaplan, R.S., Atkinson, A. Advanced management accounting,  Prentice-Hall 1998.


Business Information Systems

Prerequisite

Sound knowledge from the previous Cost Management lecture.

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Consulting expertise

  • Examining the feasibility of business-management oriented applications in defined company sectors with regard to IT support
  • project-related implementation of IT support
Duration 1 Semester
Hours per week 5.0
Overview
  • Classes:56,25 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:93,75 h

  • Workload:150 h
Credits and grades

Oral examination.

The module grade is factored in 6/90 in the final grade.

ECTS 5.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Werner Puhl

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 2
Frequency Annually (ss)
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Business Information Systems II
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-08-02
Hours per week 3.0
Lecture contents

The course covers theory and practice of business analytics.

Chapter I:

Introduction to Data Warehouse Systems and Business Intelligence, Architecture and components of DW-systems, data modelling in DW-systems, Online Analytical processing, dashboards.


Chapter II:

Implementation of a case study in the DW- system SAP BWä. Students use BI tools to analyse sales data, they create analytical reports and implement a dashboard for sales analytics.


Chapter III:

Introduction to Big Data, Data Science and Data Mining.

Goals:

Students will understand the value of Business Analytics and data related techniques. Students can make practical use of business intelligence tools in their professional life as a consultant.

Literature

Instructor provides case study material.

Sabherwal, R., Becerra-Fernandez I. Business Intelligence: Practices, Technologies, & Management, 2011.

Provost, F., Fawcett, T.: Data Science for Business, O'Reilly 2013.

Business Information Systems I
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-08-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Chapter I:

In order to position the problem area a typology of business applications and information systems is defined. The architecture of information systems is presented.

As the evaluation of information systems includes not only technical but also economic aspects, different possibilities to measure the business value of information systems are offered.

Chapter II:

Procedure models concerning the implementation of information technology are presented, as well as some methods and tools, which can be used for implementation activities (e.g. event-process-chains). As the requirements definition is a very important implementation step, a framework for a requirement catalogue is defined.

Chapter III:

A case study is presented, where the cost accounting problems of a model company are described.  Students implement the cost accounting system of the model company (overhead costing, product costing) in a standard software package (SAP ERPä). Work groups realize the different implementation steps from requirements definition until the presentation of the running system.

Goals:

As the implementation of information technology is a very important consulting field, this lecture presents methods and tools for these kinds of projects. By means of a case study, which describes a cost accounting problem, an implementation project is realized in work groups.

Literature

Keller, G., Teufel, T., SAP R/3 Process Oriented Implementation, Essex 1998.

Ramakrishnan, S., Manufacturing Finance with SAP ERP Financials, Bonn 2009.

Sharma, S., Optimize your SAP ERP Implementation, Bonn 2008.


Corporate Finance

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business for Corporate Finance I and knowledge from Corporate Finance I for the following presentation Corporate Finance II.

Teaching methods Lecture/seminar
Learning target

Expertise as a consultant

  • Preparing investment and financing decisions/controlling with regard to target/assumptions and progress monitoring
  • Planning Working Capital Management measures and implementation in a target-oriented way
  • Developing and implementing of concepts regarding Value Management; in accordance with customer-oriented specifications as e. g.

             o Structural characteristics

             o   Different economic sectors

             o   Reporting

Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:135 h

  • Workload:180 h
Credits and grades

Part 1: written examination (60 min)

Part 2: project thesis and presentation (Group examination is possible)

Both grades are equally weighed in the module grade. The module grade is factored in 7/90 in the final grade.

ECTS 6.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management" as well as for general business or industrial engineering master programs of other universities (in Germany and abroad).

Lectures Corporate Finance II
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-01-02
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Corporate Finance II keeps focus on the so-called Value Based Management which is mainly represented by the Shareholder Value Concept - an interdisciplinary approach that aligns resource allocation, financial and accounting theory and competitive analysis with the impact of creating value.

The seminar is divided into different modules that present an overview of different perspectives:
Module 1 General Framework: Introduction to value thinking
Module 2 Financial Valuation Framework: VBM and financial theory
Module 3 Strategic Valuation Framework: VBM and competitive analysis
Module 4 Technical Framework: Valuation techniques

Dealing with the first module students are introduced to value thinking. Value measures are contrasted to accounting measures. In the second module a financial perspective is taken. In the third module the strategic context is given. Module four presents an overview of different valuation methods (especially the discounted cash flow method and the economic value added approach).

In each module theory is applied on cases that focus on an international context. The cases explore the difficulties of implementing value based metrics in companies and deal with the transformation of enterprises under VBM.

Based on the case studies the lecturers moderate and comment different opinions of the groups to give students an impression of alternative solutions. Finally, each student has to work out an analyst report of a chosen company.

Literature

Arnold, G./Davies, M. (ed.): Value-based Management: Context and Application, New York et al 2000, (WD 691a).

Brealey, R. A./Myers, S. C.: Principles of Corporate Finance, 9th edn., New York 2008, (WO 216a).

Copeland, T. E./Koller, T./Murrin, J. F.: Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies, 3nd edn., New York 2000, (WD 026b).

Eccles, R. et al: The Value Reporting Revolution, New York et al 2001, (WR 190 a).

Hawawini, G.: Finance for Executives: Managing for Value Creation, Cincinnati 1999, (WO 232a).

Kaplan, R. S./Norton, D. P.: The Balanced Scorecard: Translating strategy into action, Harvard 1996, (WD 617a).

Martin, J. D./Petty, J. W.: Value-Based Management, Harvard 2000, (WD 413a).

Rappaport, A.: Creating Shareholder Value: A Guide for Managers and Investors, 2nd edn., New York 1998, (WX 039a).

Schwenker, B./Spremann, K.: Management between Strategy and Finance, Berlin 2009 (WD 920a).

S. David Young and Stephen F. O‘Byrne: EVA and Value-Based Management: A Practical Guide to Implementation, McGraw-Hill, 2001.

Corporate Finance I
Type Lecture
Nr. IBC-01-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Corporate Finance is an integrated management approach dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions on a high level of quality. Laying emphasis on a traditional point of view, the focus here is on managing cash, inventories, Corporate Finance the primary goal is to maximize corporate value.
Generally the discipline can be divided into a long-term and short-term decision making. Capital investment decisions are long-term choices about which projects receive investment, whether to finance investments with equity, debt or mezzanine capital, and to decide about the dividend policy. The Shareholder Vaule Concept - as an essential in context of managing a company - will also be covered.
On the other hand, the short term decisions can be grouped using the heading "Working capital management". This subject deals with the short-term balance of current assets and current liabilitiesand short-term borrowing and lending (described as accounts receivables).

Due to didactical reasons the lesson Corporate Finance is divided in two parts (Corporate Finance I offered in winter term and Corporate Finance II in summer term each year).

Corporate Finance I keeps focus on the traditional field of Investment and Finance. Based upon an introduction which answers the general question "Which are the tasks of a CFO?" the lesson is divided into three parts:

Part 1 Objects of investments
Part 2 Net Present Value and other Investment Criteria
Part 3 Accounting & Finance
Profit & Loss Statement*
Cash flow Statement
Alternatives of financing
Part 4 Working Capital Management
*A deeper insight to the topic of profit & loss statement will be given in the modules Accounting I and II.

Part two, three and four apply case studies to pursue the required practical approach.

Literature

Brealey, R.A./Myers, S.C./ Marcus, A. J.: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 5th edn., New York 2004.

Handout Investment & Finance, Prof. Dr.D. May, Prof. Dr. R. Fischer, University of AS Offenburg.

Arnold, G./Davies M. (ed.): Value-based Management: Context and Application, New York et al 2000.

Brealey, R. A./Myers, S.C.: Principles of Corporate Finance, 9th edn., New York 2008.

Copeland, T. E./Koller, T./Murrin, J. F.: Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies, 3nd edn., New York 2000.

Eccles, R. et al: The Value Reporting Revolution, New York et al 2001.
 
Hawawini, G.: Finance for Executives: Managing for Value Creation, Cincinnati 1999.

Schwenker, B./Spremann, K.: Management between Strategy and Finance, Berlin 2009.

S. David Young and Stephen F. O’Byrne: EVA and Value-Based Management: A Practical Guide to Implementation, McGraw-Hill, 2001.


German Language

Prerequisite

No knowledge required.

Teaching methods Lecture
Learning target

German Language is the third topic of the Compulsory elective core subject catalogue and gives students the opportunity to learn the German language. This offer has been existing since the beginning of the program. The basic idea is that


o    many things in daily life (incl. becoming acquainted with the host country’s culture) are only possible with basic language skills
o    Acquisition of German language skills in order to strengthen the student’s profile

However, only 2 credit points can be acquired by choosing German language from the Compulsory elective core subject catalogue.

Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:75 h

  • Workload:120 h
Credits and grades

Written exam

The elective subjects are factored in 8/90 in the final grade and are equally weighed in the module grade.

ECTS 2.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

English-speaking Bachelor's and Master's degree courses.

Lectures German Language
Type Lecture
Nr. IBC-13-01
Hours per week 4.0
Literature

Begegnungen Deutsch als Fremdsprache, A1+/A2+/B1+, Anne Buscha, Schubert Verlag.

Erkundungen Deutsch als Fremdsprache B2, Anne Buscha, Susanne Raven, Szilvia Szita, Schubert Verlag.


Integrated Case Study

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business Administration and previous lectures like Corporate Finance I and II, Cost Management, Marketing, Leadership Management.

 

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Ability to act in a target-oriented way as a consultant in a complex project characterized by the interdependencies of tasks; i. e.

  • Planning and implementation of the project and its operational budgets
  • Using extensive business know-how
  • Role-specific acting as a consultant, also as presenter among other things 
Duration 1 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:75 h

  • Workload:120 h
Credits and grades

Part 1: project thesis and presentation (Group examination is possible)

Part 2: written examination (60 min)

Part 1 is factored in 70 %, part 2 in 30 %.

The module grade is factored in 5/90 in the final grade.

ECTS 4.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 2
Frequency Annually (ss)
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management" as well as for general business or industrial engineering master programs of other universities (in Germany and abroad).

 

Lectures Integrated Case Study
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-09-01
Hours per week 4.0
Lecture contents

The final orientation of the lesson is to draw up a business plan for a new company.

Against the background of a defined idea of the product the students have to cover the following topics:

• Marketing / Production & Logistics Strategy
- defining a sales & production program (based upon informsationd from the market research)
- defining price policy, communication policy and distribution policy
- defining the production & logistics strategy (inclu-ding the strategic question of make or buy)
• Cost & Income Accounting based upon tools such as
- Standard Costing
- ABC (Activity Based Costing)
- Sales and profit planning
• Project Management
• Design & Implementation of an E-Commerce Application
• Deriving the Business Plan comprising the following as-pects (compulsory):
o Management Summary
o Product/product strategy
o Marketing
o Investment & Finance
o Fiscal year statements for the coming years (including financial ratios)

Different teams cover the mentioned topics. The quality of the results of the teams determines the quality of the final business plan which is decisive for the readiness of the in-vestors to invest.

Additional inputs to defined topics will be delivered.

Literature

Will be announced in the kick off-meeting.


Leadership Management

Prerequisite

No prerequisites required

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Acquiring extensive leadership competency which can be used in the day-to-day routine of operative as well as strategic Consulting.

Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 6.0
Overview
  • Classes:67,5 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:112,5 h

  • Workload:180 h
Credits and grades

Project Work

The module grade is factored in 7/90 in the final grade.

 

 

ECTS 6.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can partly be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Psychological Aspects of Consulting
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-10-02
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

The course is designed to deliver know how of social and psychological impacts in consulting interactions. It will give a pragmatic understanding of the psychological importance in consulting processes, that go far beyond handling technical questions or problems. Consultants have to be aware of the fact that one of the most important success-factors in con-sulting are due to a constructive dynamic of social interactions and psychological effects.

The general understanding of human behavior in change developments and intended change processes gives a closer insight of the psychological success factors or traps in the consulting work. Major aspects of communication, cognitive, emotional and pragmatic learning behavior as well as the understanding of roles and power help to give orientation in the interaction between client and consultant.

Various models of transaction analysis, personality types, group dynamics and conflict developments will be applied to rationalize typical situations as well as crises in consulting work and how to deal with them.

Finally, questions of team building and individual psychological challenges of consulting professionals are discussed and experimented with the students.

Literature

Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce M. Patton: Das Harvard-Konzept , Frankfurt a.M. 2009.

Don Beck, Christopher Cowan: Spiral Dynamics, Bielefeld 2008.

Daniel Goleman: Emotional Intelligence, NewYork 1997.

Thomas A. Harris: I'm OK-You're OK (Transactional analy-sis), Reinbek 2009.

Spencer Johnson: Who moved my Cheese. An amazing Way to Deal with Change in your Work and in your Life, London 2002.

Bernard Mayer: The Dynamics of Conflict Resolution: A Practitioner's Guide, San Francisco 2000.

Richard Rohr / Andreas Ebert: Enneagram : A Christian Perspective, NewYork 2002.

Frank Schneegans: Seven Steps to control changes, Düs-seldorf 2001.

Frederic Vester: Thinking, Learning, Forgetting, München 2007.

Managing People in Projects
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-10-03
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

No matter in which field of consulting the students will later on work, the human factor will always play a tremendous role. This module is based on the Organisational Behaviour unit that is, the contents will be intensified and complemented with the topics of leadership, motivation and team work/dynamics. The students will learn what it means to lead people in international settings, how others (team members as well as consulting clients) can be motivated and how conflicts and team dynamics can be faced. participative and achievement orientated)
Accompanied by theoretical inputs and discussions, most of the class time will be spent on practical application of the key skills and what it means for managing people in consulting projects. The methods applied will be class discussion, case analysis, role play and team work.

Goals

To acquire knowledge and practical skills in the fields of:

  • Leadership and leadership development - theory and practice skills
  • Motivation - theoretical models and tools to motivate people especially in consulting processes
  • Team work and group dynamics
Literature

Management and Organisational Behaviour 8th edition (Paperback) by Laurie J. Mullin, Financial Times Management, 2007.

Organisational Behaviour
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-10-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Organisational Behaviour deals with the behaviour as well as with the thoughts and feelings of people working in organizations. The course focuses on individuals, interpersonal relations and the resulting intergroup dynamics and thus chooses the micro perspective on the topic of organisational behaviour. The course is complemented by the unit "Managing People in consulting projects" in the summer term. In "Organisational Behaviour" the following topics are addressed:

  • Managing self
  • Managing communications
  • Managing diversity
  • Managing (across) cultures

During the course the students will learn about the basic principles of communication and reflect on their own personality and culture. Based on this self-reflection the students will acquire an understanding of the complex interrelations of these factors at workplace and how they can be handled in order to create a good and creative work atmosphere.

Once rapidly covered theory, most of class time will be spent on practical application of the key skills through class discussion, case analysis, role play and team work.

This course provides the foundation for the next class, Managing People (OB II) in which the focus will be on Leadership, Motivation and Team Work.

Goals:

  • Understanding the core principles of communication and the obstacles of miscommunication for an organisation.
  • Understanding different personality types and learning how to make them work together efficiently.
  • Understanding one's own cultural values, the differences and commonalities between cultures and learning how to deal with them.
Literature

Management and Organisational Behaviour 8th edition (Paperback) by Laurie J. Mullin, Financial Times Management, 2007.


Logistics and Simulation

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business Administration.

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Description and targets of the module

The module „Logistics“ reflects the broad scope of the term Logistics and intends to highlight numerous facets of logistics.

On the one hand, the course „Production & Operations Management“ examines decision-making processes in operations management as well as their common points with regard to other managerial functions – from the perspective of a management consultant.

On the other hand, the course „Production & Operations Management“ is rather focusing on Intra Logistics, and the course “Supply Chain Management” highlights the networking of logistical processes on a global level before dealing with “classical” tools as e. g. „ Supply Network Planning“, „Available to Promisse“.

The course „Modeling & Simulation“ und „Simulation Cases“ provides information with regard to the forming of logistical networks. After a basic introduction into the topic, the relation to concrete managerial problems is made.


A conceptual frame of reference is created covering the wide field of the subject Logistics by means of four courses comprising

-  Production & Operations Management

-  Supply Chain Management

-  Modeling & Simulation

-  Simulation Cases

which are complemented by peripheral sub-divisions as e. g. Marketing.

 

As with the other modules, it is not only the goal of the module to fulfill all module-oriented tasks. The learning target is rather

 

-     to perceive  inherent possibilities of design in the Logistics field
 
-     to show performance- and cost-related consequences of design options on a functional level

-     to document design options with regard to their company-wide effects as e. g. the Return on Investment

-     to document design options with regard to their company-wide effects expressed for example by key performance indicators like service levels, Return on Investment..

Learning Outcomes

Consulting expertise in the fields of

-     Intra-Logistics

-     Inter-Logistics

Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 8.0
Overview
  • Classes:90 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:150 h

  • Workload:240 h
Credits and grades

Written examination of 120 min

Project Work

The module grade is factored in 9/90 in the final grade.

ECTS 8.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can partly be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Simulation Cases
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-06-04
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Based on the knowledge of the lecture "Simulation and Modeling" you will have the opportunity to build a whole simulation project from scratch. This project is related to other subjects of your curriculum like supply chain management or transportation, production line or resource planning aspects.

The class starts with a short recapitulation of the basics of the simulation process as well in the use of Simio. Afterwards we will go into the projects problem definition and the clarification of the project goals.

During the following major part you have to realize a complete simulation project including a project management plan, the implementation of the problem domain in Simio, the evaluation of the results as well a short presentation of your work and your recommendations. This project has to be realized in a group of up to four students and is support by the lecturer.

Goals

General:

  • improving social competence by working in small international groups
  • improving analytical skills

Specific:

  • understanding the essence of complex systems
  • gathering practical experience in the simulation process
  • developing and analyzing a small real world system
Literature

Kelton, Smith, Sturrock, Simio & Simulation, Third Edition, McGraw-Hill 2013.

Jeffrey Allen Joines, Stephen Dean Roberts, Simulation Modelling with SIMIO: A Workbook, 2013.

Production and Operations Management
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-06-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Increasing volatile feedstock markets, exchanges rates and shorter product life cycles require flexible and agile organizations that are able to quickly adapt to changes in the environment. Managerial decision processes are becoming more complex and are demanding. This does not only require vast knowledge of business processes, but also the application of tools and models to take decisions in order to lead a successful organization.

This course emphasizes, from a management consultant's perspective, on managerial decision making and respective implementation of change in production and operations and the interrelationship with other functional areas of a corporation as well as with its suppliers and customers. The fundamental topics of this course include the Production System Design, Strategic and Operational Planning and Total Quality. Particular emphasis is given to the modern system of Lean Production and Just-in-Time logistic system.

As the Supply Chain Management course focuses in particular on IT-related problems, this course is intended to be more conceptual and thus helps to understand different perspectives and solutions for the numerous issues in operations management.

The students will have to make themselves familiar with the topics covered in the script, by reading and answering the questions related to the respective chapter.

Additional reading is required as basis for case studies in group-work help the students to actually apply the learned lessons. The respective results will be presented to the other students and the instructor.

The visit of a state of the art manufacturing facility helps to better understand the interrelationship of theory and practice. The observations are to be discussed in class.

Web-based Multiple Choice Questions support the self-controlled learning progress and help the students to identify and improve potential gaps.

Literature

Arnold, Tony, Introduction to Materials Management, 2nd edition, Eaglewood Cliffland, N.Y. 1996.

Ritman, Larry, Krajewski, Lee, Operations Management, Strategy and Analysis, 3rd edition, Reading (Massachusettes) 1993.

Womack, J.T., Jones, D.T., Ross, Daniel, The Machine that changed the world, New York, 1990.

Collins, Jim, Good to Great, 1st edition, Harper Business, New Nork, NY, 2001.

Modeling and Simulation
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-06-02
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Simulation and modeling is getting more and more important to study a complex System, to measure its performance, to improve its operation or to evaluate different design decisions if it doesn't exist. Systems in this case could be built by manufacturing processes, by workflow systems, business processes or combinations of them. Today, powerful desk top computers and simulators make it possible to establish modeling and simulation as a standard tool in a company.

The class starts with an introduction into simulation and modeling in general and the Simio simulation software in particular. This includes an overview of the different simulation approaches and available modeling languages as well the basic concepts of the Simio simulation software.

The following major part gives you the opportunity to gather simulation experience by realizing a set of small case studies or labs.

Goals:

General:

  • Improving social competence by working in small international groups
  • Improving analytical skills

Specific:

  • Understanding the essence of complex systems
  • Understanding the fundamental simulation concepts
  • Developing and analyzing simple models based on Simio
  • Understanding some statistical issues
Literature

Kelton, Smith, Sturrock, Simio & Simulation, Third Edition, McGraw-Hill 2013., C. Dennis Pegden, David T. Sturrock, Rapid Modelling Solutions: Introduction to Simulation and Simio.

Supply Chain Management IBC
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-06-03
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Supply Chain Management is a strategic approach as well as a method to plan, operate, optimize and control such logistics' networks. This is supported by specially designed software systems (SCM-Tools).

The first part of the seminar is about the strategic aspects of SCM like the optimization of international Logistics' networks (e.g. procurement & distribution structures and processes) by modeling and simulation approaches tasking into account cost (e.g. transport, warehousing), capital employed (e.g. inventory, investments) and service level (e.g. delivery time) objectives. The important managerial perspective of "Make or Buy"-decisions is discussed as well, because outsourcing is an important option of modern Logistics. Furthermore process redesign and reengineering are introduced to the audience, as well as Supply Chain Controlling (SCC) based on predefined Key Performance Indicators (KPI) like the international used standard Supply Chain Operation Reference-Model (SCOR).

The second part of the seminar is dealing with the philoso-phy and the basic functions of operational Supply Chain Management like Demand Planning (DP), Advanced Production Planning and Scheduling (APS), Supply Network Planning (SNP), Available to Promise (ATP). The latter are supported by special SCM-Tools. Thus, the IS-aspects of Supply Chain Management are explained within a short introduction of common SCM-Tools like SAP-APO, i2-Rhythm and Wassermann-Way. Directly linked to the IS-aspects of SCM are the interfaces and connections between Supply Chain Management and e-Business / e-Commerce (B2B and B2C). Important is also the gap between the philosophy of SCM (planning and control of worldwide inter company networks) to the reality (optimization of intra and inter company value chains)

The whole seminar will be permanently enriched by up to date know-how from ongoing consulting projects in the SCM field to demonstrate the practical benefit of SCM-approaches in context of logistics consulting.

Three case studies in the fields of distribution structure, e-commerce and the operational planning aspect will be involved. The methods to be used are (among others) the calculation of "Transport Performance", deployment calculations and the use of "Multi Attributive Decision Making" (MADM). The results of the different groups are presented to the participants and discussed with the whole seminar.

Finally, two different case studies of current consulting projects, done by admoVa Consulting are presented to the participants (starting from the data evaluation up to the final recommendation) and will be discussed with the different groups. Furthermore, the students are instructed in the method of "Business Process Optimization" (BPO) and the "Supply Chain Operation Reference-Model" (SCOR).

Literature

Chopra, S.; Meindl, P. (2006): Supply Chain Management. Strategy, Planning, and Operation. 3rd Ed. Upper Saddle River.

Christopher, M. (1998): Logistics and Supply Chain Man-agement. Strategies for Reducing Cost and Improving Ser-vice. 2nd Ed. London.

Simchi-Levi, D.; Kaminsky, P.; Simchi-Levi, E. (2008): De-signing and Managing the Supply Chain: Concepts, Strategies and Case Studies. 3rd Ed. Boston.


Master's Thesis

Prerequisite

Successful attendance of courses with acquisition of at least 85% credit points.

Teaching methods Thesis/seminar
Learning target

Ability to write a scientific thesis at the Master's level, other learning targets depend on the topic.

Duration 1 Semester
Hours per week 1.0
Overview
  • Classes:11,25 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:888,75 h

  • Workload:900 h
Credits and grades

30 CP in total

- 23 CP for the Master's thesis, 60-90 pages

- 6 CP for the colloquium

- 1 CP for attendance of the seminar Scientific Work

ECTS 30.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 3
Frequency Every sem.
Lectures Scientific work
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-14-01
Hours per week 1.0
Colloquium
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-14-03
Hours per week 0.0
Master-Thesis
Type Thesis
Nr. IBC-14-02
Hours per week 0.0

Microeconomics

Prerequisite

Basics in mathematics.

Teaching methods Lecture
Learning target

After completing the module, students should be able to

  • Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources, that scarcity forces choices and that every choice has an opportunity cost.
  • Understand how comparative advantage provides the basis for gains through trade.
  • List the determinants of the demand and supply for a good in a competitive market and explain how demand and supply together determine equilibrium price.
  • Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government price controls.
  • Understand the costs of production and how profit-maximizing firms determine how much to produce. Be able to distinguish between long-run decisions and short-run decisions.
  • Distinguish between perfect competetion and imperfect competition and be able to explain the welfare loss in non-competitive markets.
  • Understand the interdependence of market structure and firm behavior in specific industries.
Duration 1 Semester
Hours per week 2.0
Overview
  • Classes:22,5 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:67,5 h

  • Workload:90 h
Credits and grades

Written exam (60 min).

The module grade is factored in 4/90 in the final grade.

 

ECTS 3.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Weiß

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1
Frequency Annually (ws)
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Microeconomics
Type Lecture
Nr. IBC-02-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Microeconomics is about the allocation of scarce resources. Its analytical starting point is the behavior of individual economic units. These units include consumers, workers, investors, owners of land, business firms etc. More generally, any individual or entity that plays a role in the functioning of our economy can be the subject of microeconomic analysis. Microeconomics explains how and why these units make economic decisions.

Another important concern of microeconomics is how economic units interact to form larger entities, especially markets and industries. By studying the behavior and interaction of individual firms and consumers, microeconomics reveals the determinants of equilibrium market prices and quantities, how industries and markets evolve, why they differ from one another, and how they are affected by government policies and global economic conditions.

The lecture contains an introduction into a part of microeconomics called industrial organization. This is the study of how market performance in a specific industry depends on market structure and market conduct. For example, industrial organization addresses the question, how the number of firms affects pricing decisions of individual firms and the efficiency of the overall outcome.

The lecture is divided into three parts:

Part A   Introduction

1     Ten Principles of Economics

2     Thinking Like an Economist

3     Interdependence and the Gains from Trade

 

Part B   Supply and Demand

4     The Market Forces of Supply and Demand

5     Elasticity and Its Application

6     Supply, Demand and Government Policies

7     Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of Markets

 

Part C   Firm Behavior and the Organization of Industry

8     The Costs of Production

9     Firms in Competitive Markets

10   Monopoly

11   Monopolistic Competition

12   Oligopoly

Literature

Mankiw, N. Gregory/Taylor, Mark P. (2011), Microeconomics, Second Edition, Cengage Learning.

Pindyck, Robert S./Rubinfeld, Daniel L. (2013), Microeconomics, Eighth Edition, Pearson Education.

A comprehensive set of lecture slides will be provided.


Operational Consulting

Prerequisite

Knowledge in Business Administration, further knowledge required depending on the subject.

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Description and targets of the module

According to the study and examination regulations, the students must chose courses from the compulsory elective core subject catalogue with the goal to acquire 8 credit points in total.

The Compulsory elective core subject catalogue consists of three subjects:
-    Operational Consulting
-    Strategic Consulting
-    German Language.
 
The contents of the first two fields - Operational Consulting and Strategic Consulting - provide an attractive additional offer intending to hone and further improve the program profile. Numerous courses have – in addition to the compulsory subjects - an interdisciplinary character. This character is even more pronounced by including students from the engineering MSc program of the Offenburg University of Applied Sciences.

Even if the separation between the „operational“ and „strategic“ aspect is not always given (which is by the way also the case in practice), all subjects are with regard to content either a continuation of the subjects of the compulsory catalogue or are new topics.

German Language is the third topic of the Compulsory elective core subject catalogue and gives students the opportunity to learn the German language. This offer has been existing since the beginning of the program. The basic idea is that

o    many things in daily life (incl. becoming acquainted with the host country’s culture) are only possible with basic language skills
o    Acquisition of German language skills in order to strengthen the student’s profile

However, only 2 credit points can be acquired by choosing German language from the Compulsory elective core subject catalogue.

Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 8.0
Overview
  • Classes:90 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:150 h

  • Workload:240 h
Credits and grades

Project work

The elective subjects are factored in 8/90 in the final grade and are equally weighed in the module grade.

ECTS 8.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can partly be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Project Management
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-11-03
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

The Project Environment
• Definitions
• Project structures
• Project Manager
• Communication difficulties
• The difference of R&D projects
• Over-the-wall approach
Project Management Methods
• Project Planning
• Breakdown of an objective into different tasks
• The Timeline: Gantt
• Network Diagrams: CPM, PERT
The particularities of the R&D function
• The career of scientists and engineers
• Why scientists and engineers do not really plan?
• Defense reactions and how to avoid them
Project Management Software
• Necessity and Motivation
• Data structure
• Views, Graphics and Reports
• Use of PM Software
Management Systems for R&D
• Components
• Implementation phases
• Freezing the system into rules
• Quality norms: ISO 9000, QS 9000, VDA, AFNOR, etc.
During the course, students will identify a case study of a typical innovation project which runs into difficulties, and learn to organize, plan and manage such a project. Topics will include resource allocation, continuous re-planning, implementing early warning systems, managing crises etc.
The students will be assessed on their capacity to translate the learned theory into practice (project planning, tracking and management), as well as on their capacity to reflect on topics adjacent to project management. To this end, the following evaluations are foreseen:
• Identification and detailed description of an innovation project through analysis of press articles, literature, personal experience, etc. Definition of objectives for a re-orientation of the project. (Presentation)
• Detailed organization of the project using the techniques discussed in the lecture and modern project management tools. (continuous evaluation)
• Project recovery presentation.

The University of Offenburg is currently negotiating terms for the introduction of a new IT-based project management and planning system. Depending on the outcome of these negotiations, a tool-specific evaluation may replace one or several of the above mentioned evaluations.

Literature

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, Project Management Institute Standards Committee

Managing Complexity
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-11-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

The course is designed to provide a fundamental basis for management and leadership in the information age. It will introduce a scientific and philosophical approach to management and explore the historical origins of an analytical methodology that allows profound insight into the behaviour of processes and systems. It will teach that management is prediction and provide an understanding of a methodology for transforming raw data into knowledge in order to secure a sound basis for future action. Case histories will demonstrate how the costly errors of inappropriate action and sub-optimisation can be avoided and how a scientific basis for continual improvement and sustainable competitiveness is achieved.

Links to system thinking, human behaviour and the theory of knowledge (epistemology) will be maintained throughout the course.

Literature

- Wheeler, Donald J, 1993, Understanding Variation - The Key to Managing Chaos, SPC Press Inc.
- Wheeler, Donald J, 1995, Advanced Topics in Statistical Process Control, SPC Press Inc.
- Deming, W. Edwards, 1982, 1986, Out of the Crisis, Massa-chusetts Institute of Technology
- Neave, Henry R. 1990, The Deming Dimension, SPC Press Inc.
- Scholtes, Peter R., 1998, The Leaders Handbook, McGraw-Hill
- Deming, W. Edwards, 1994, 1995, The New Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Strategic and Marketing Management

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business Administration.

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Marketing is the study and practice of providing goods or services that satisfy both consumer and industrial users. An effective marketing process is responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying consumer and industrial users requirements profitably.

The aim of this lesson is to provide the fundamental concepts of strategic marketing management and to practice applications of the key marketing skills and frameworks including:

  • Marketing Mix (Product, Price, Place [distribution], Promotion)
  • Quantitative analysis (covering tools from cost accounting such as break-even analysis)
  • Brand identity prism
  • Product Life cycles
  • International strategic marketing perspectives

The class will be highly practical and interactive focusing on utilising case examples using quantitative marketing tools (as well as market research and E-Learning tools will be used).


Goals

General:

Understanding

  • the principles of modern strategic marketing as an important entrepreneurial function
  • the existing interdependencies to other functional areas which have to be taken into account in the context of decision making

Specific:

Expertise in

  • using the different Marketing tools
  • involving additional tools from other functional areas such as cost accounting, investment & finance market research techniques
Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:105 h

  • Workload:150 h
Credits and grades

Project work

The module grade is factored in 6/90 in the final grade.

 

ECTS 5.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. R. Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Strategic and Marketing Management
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-05-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Marketing is the study and practice of providing goods or services that satisfy both consumer and industrial users. An effective marketing process is responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying consumer and industrial users requirements profitably.

The aim of this lesson is to provide the fundamental concepts of strategic marketing management and to practice applications of the key marketing skills and frameworks including:

  • Marketing Mix (Product, Price, Place [distribution], Promotion)
  • Quantitative analysis (covering tools from cost accounting such as break-even analysis)
  • Brand identity prism
  • Product Life cycles
  • International strategic marketing perspectives

The class will be highly practical and interactive focusing on utilising case examples using quantitative marketing tools (as well as market research and E-Learning tools will be used).


Goals

General:

Understanding

  • the principles of modern strategic marketing as an important entrepreneurial function
  • the existing interdependencies to other functional areas which have to be taken into account in the context of decision making

Specific:

Expertise in

  • using the different Marketing tools
  • involving additional tools from other functional areas such as cost accounting, investment & finance market research techniques
Literature

Marketing Management Global Edition 14th Edition by Philip Kotler and Kevin Lane Keller (2014) ISBN13: 9780273777069 Pearson Publishing.


Strategic Consulting

Prerequisite

Knowledge in Business Administration, further knowledge required depending on the subject.

Teaching methods Seminar
Learning target

Description and targets of the module

According to the study and examination regulations, the students must chose courses from the compulsory elective core subject catalogue with the goal to acquire 8 credit points in total.

The Compulsory elective core subject catalogue consists of three subjects:
-    Operational Consulting
-    Strategic Consulting
-    German Language.
 
The contents of the first two fields - Operational Consulting and Strategic Consulting - provide an attractive additional offer intending to hone and further improve the program profile. Numerous courses have – in addition to the compulsory subjects - an interdisciplinary character. This character is even more pronounced by including students from the engineering MSc program of the Offenburg University of Applied Sciences.

Even if the separation between the „operational“ and „strategic“ aspect is not always given (which is by the way also the case in practice), all subjects are with regard to content either a continuation of the subjects of the compulsory catalogue or are new topics.

German Language is the third topic of the Compulsory elective core subject catalogue and gives students the opportunity to learn the German language. This offer has been existing since the beginning of the program. The basic idea is that

o    many things in daily life (incl. becoming acquainted with the host country’s culture) are only possible with basic language skills
o    Acquisition of German language skills in order to strengthen the student’s profile

However, only 2 credit points can be acquired by choosing German language from the Compulsory elective core subject catalogue.

Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 8.0
Overview
  • Classes:90 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:150 h

  • Workload:240 h
Credits and grades

Project work/Written exam

The elective subjects are factored in 8/90 in the final grade and are equally weighed in the module grade.

ECTS 8.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can partly be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Business Development
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-03
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

This course will study, for the first time, the need, definition, and drivers of business development.  The course will focus on the process of business development as a whole, beginning with determining the need for growth, analysing all the steps involved and ending with the handover and organizational implications phase.

The course will be divided into five parts. The first part will serve as an introduction that will discuss the imperatives, challenges, and tracks and directions of growth, through illustrating several models, in addition to laying the foundation of the remaining structure of the course, such as discussing the definition of BD, the scope, limits and handover. The second part will be devoted to the analysis and classification of the different models of BD. Part 3 will concentrate on illustrating the different tracks of growth, such as mergers, acquisitions, outsourcing and so forth. The following part will examine the planning process, ending with the handover and challenges involved throughout the way. The final part will be dedicated to understanding the organizational implications of BD, in terms of identifying and using company resources.


Goals:

1.    Discuss the business environment and the need for development through illustrating the different BD models

2.    Define BD and discuss the delicate position of BD as the link between the strategic and operational levels

3.    Understand strategy decoding and the use of balanced score cards

4.    Discuss BD external and internal drivers

5.    Understand the different BD directions; market development, product development, diversification, and integration.

6.    Identify the key growth tracks and the conditions for using each.

7.    Master the mechanics of building a business case.

8.    Appreciate the different challenges involved during the implementation and handover phases

9.    Learning the process and perils of sharing company resources, whether financial or operational

Literature

Ahmed Taher and Hatem ElZuhairy, Business Development: Strategic Growth Management, EduGate 2014. 

The text and cases will be available as a reading package to be available at the University Bookstore.

Benchmarking
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-10
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Definition: "Benchmarking is a practical tool for improving performance by learning from best practices and the processes by which they are achieved" (Benchmarking in Europe).
Benchmarking - as a strategic management tool - involves looking inward and outward (outside your own company, organisation, industry, region or country) to examine how others achieve their performance levels and to understand the processes they use. In this way benchmarking helps to explain the processes behind excellent performance. When the lessons learnt from a benchmarking exercise are applied appropriately, they facilitate improved performance in critical functions within an organisation or in key areas of the business environment.
Application of benchmarking involves four basic steps:
1) Understand in detail the key processes of an organisation
2) Analyse the processes of others internal or external
3) Compare your own performance with that of others
4) Implement the steps necessary to close the gap.

The course gives an overview of the theories on the benchmarking topic backed up by practical commentary based on experience of consulting and on teaching management issues. Through small case studies, the major process steps of the benchmarking technique can be extracted leading to a practical guideline for benchmarking projects.
Having the theoretical explanation of Benchmarking and the practical approach applied will finally end in useful check-lists and forms helping the student to do a benchmarking project on their own. Learning in small groups how to conduct a process benchmarking project by getting experience with operational management tools like Process Mapping and Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) will provide the students with the skill set needed to succeed and to achieve the goals set in benchmarking projects, besides getting an insight into writing a report for the executive management level.

Literature

- Bendell, Tony et al (1997). The Benchmarking Workout, Pearson Education Ltd, Harlow, UK
- Bendell, Tony et al. (1993). Benchmarking for Competitive Advantage, Financial Times/Pitman Publishing
- Mitchell, Anthony (1994). The Quality Pocketbook, Management Pocketbooks
- Bicheno, John. (1998). The Quality 60, PICSIE Books, Buckingham

Management of Consultancies
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-04
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

The focus of this lesson is kept on the consulting company itself. The aspects which will be covered are:

A Positioning of the professional consultancy
- Strategic options:
o focus on problem and/or industry branches and/or location
o specialism vs. generalism
o standardised problem solving vs. customer tailored consulting
o international vs. local
o partner oriented structure vs. hierarchical structure
- Developping its strategy:
o Who are the clients? What are their needs?
o Competitor analysis
o What can we offer?, What do we know? Strenght and weaknesses
o Creating a competitive advantage: strategic fit of clients needs and own know-how, strengths and consulting products
- Marketing to existing and new clients:
o broadcasting tactics
o principals of professional consulting marketing

B The Consulting Process
- relationship management and client contact
- preproposal (background research, meeting with client, etc.) and proposal
excursus: basic legal aspects (e.g. contract of work and labour or contract of services)
- managing the consulting project/engagement (pre-engagement activities, engagement planning, engagement management and control, client file, engagement close-out)
- quality management (e.g. client satisfaction, engagement management and review)

C Leadership, management and organisational aspects
- Business basics: Utilisation and realization as the two main figures for a consulting company
- Partner structure: different role of partners (relationship management, client contact, project management)
- Partner structure: partners, senior and junior consultants;
- developing a corporate culture; ethics
- fees and fee-sharing, leverage effect
- Careers: performance appraisal, career development, objective setting
- Incentives model and bonus guidelines
- What makes a good consultant?
- Know-How development

 

Goals:

 

Developing an expertise in managing a professional consulting company based upon a deeper insight to

-          basic strategic options

-          the procedural method of developing a strategy for a consulting company

-          the ratios which are essential for managing a consulting company

-          the relevant leadership, management and organisational aspects

Literature

Handout

Financial Accounting and Reporting II
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-07
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Based on the knowledge of Financial Reporting I, the students will learn how to interpret and adopt a variety of Financial Reporting instruments and understand the Interrelations between them. The data underlying the analyses is created using a business simulation.

This business simulation is a computer-based case study to give students real business experience and simulate the cross-functional nature of business within a competitive market place.

Students are divided into teams and assigned the task of running a company, competing within a dynamic and competitive environment against other student-run firms. In the role as company co-managers students will need to formulate their strategy, handle financial reports, analyze market research and use forecasting tools. As each year progresses students must analyze the changing market place, understand their customers' needs and make managerial decisions relating to marketing mix, purchase, product development, production capacity and amount as well as finance for the coming year. As each year progresses, the number and complexity of decisions to be taken will increase. The challenge is to craft and execute a competitive strategy that results in good financial performance and outlook against competitors.

Theoretical learning sessions will be integrated into the business simulation to ensure students' progress in learning. The following topics will be covered on the basis of this experiential learning course:

  • Strategy and target planning
  • Sales planning
  • Marketing mix (price, product, distribution and communication politics)
  • Capacity planning and budgeting
  • Capital budgeting
  • Contribution costing
  • Income statements
  • Financial statements.

Students will gain practice in making a variety of different business decisions under circumstances that mirror real-world competitive conditions. They will be challenged to make decisions within their management team despite forecast uncertainty and time pressure.

All these skills have to be reflected to the respective reporting instruments.

Goals:

Soft Skills:

  • Improve diversity, in particular by working in international, multi-ethnic teams to achieve
    measurable results
  • Improve presentation skills by repeatedly presenting the results of group assignments.
  • Improve self-study ability.

Hard Skills:

  • Achieving a general understanding of Financial Accounting, the accounting equation, the double
    entry bookkeeping system and the interrelations between internal and external Accounting.
  • Achieving a deeper insight into Financial Accounting, International Financial Reporting Standard
    and the presentation of Financial Statements.

·         Acquiring the qualification to evaluate the impact of the strategic decision making on the fiscal year
          statement.

Literature

In-class materials, handouts and script.
Annual Reports
Thilo Seyfriedt: IFRS@Examples, 2nd Edition, Createspace, 2013.

Risk Management
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-06
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Aspects of Integrated Management Systems and the correlation of different views:

  • Business Process Management
  • Environmental Safety Management
  • Financial Management
  • Risk Management
  • Knowledge Management

• Innovation Management

 

Aspects of Risk Management:

  • Difference between risk management of individuals and organizations
  • Event-driven definitions of risk management: Market risk, liquidity risk, credit risk, operational risk, legal risk etc.
  • Managing risks: Strategies for managing different types of risks

• Analyzing risks at all steps in the physical supply chain in industrial and service organizations

 

Further key words: Balanced Score Card (BSC), Performance Measurement, Quality Function Deployment (QFD), Benchmarking.

 

Goals:

Students will build up an expertise in fundamental principles and aspects of realizing an integrated management system considering aspects like process management, environmental safety management and risk management.

They will understand that risk management is considering a wide range of aspects and is directly linked with other management views like e.g. process, quality and knowledge management.

A goal but also a challenge for the students is to cover this topic with students coming from other Master programs (which are driven by engineering and IT aspects). This requires to deal with other ´mentalities'.

Literature

Operations and Process Management; Nigel Slack et al.; Prentice Hall, 2008.

The Risk Management Process - Business Strategy and Tactics; Christopher L. Culp; John Wiley & Sons, 2001.

Operations Management; Nigel Slack et al.; Prentice Hall, 2001.

The Balanced Scorecard - Translating Strategy into Action; Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton; McGraw-Hill Harvard Business School Press, 1996.

Further references will be mentioned during the seminar

Turnaround Management II
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-05
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Some relevant aspects of turnaround projects are discussed in detail from the consultant's point of view:

• Elaborating the detailed Turnaround Concept and the Business Plan
• Managing the restructuring process
• Negotiating the reorganization with the various participants and stakeholders
• Introducing and maintaining an appropriate controlling process for the restructuring phase

In section "Turnaround Concept and Business Plan" the following questions will be answered:
• How to get the basic data?
• How to quantify means and measures?
• How to create cash forecasts?
• How to ensure error free business plans with respect to the p&l-account, cash forecasts and the future balance sheets?

In section "Managing the restructuring process" we will talk about typical restructuring measures and typical problems arising, e.g. elimination of business fields, reducing staff, reducing inventory.

As many participants both internal and external ones are involved in the restructuring process, such as banks, suppliers, supplier's credit insurances, trade unions, competitors, investors etc. we will discuss their various points of interests and the roles they are playing in the process. The students will also get an understanding of interacting with different consultants acting on behalf of the various stakeholders.

Controlling procedures in a turn around situation will differ from the ones maintained in typical going concern organizations. In particular controlling cash flows and liquidity will become a crucial issue in the controlling environment.

All these aspects will be discussed based upon real cases. The students will create programs, spreadsheets etc. which can be used within turnaround projects.

Literature

Handout and cases.

Board of Directors
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-02
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

The concept of the (board) game is that students will "be in charge" for an already existing company which is producing machine tools. They act as members of the management board. In other words:

-          a strategic concept - based upon the current entrepreneurial situation which is close to bankruptcy - has to be developed (which will be realized during the coming 5 business years)

-          this concept has to be transferred to the functional areas and its decision-making

-          the companies have to be managed by using common ratios.

Additionally aspects of team management are also covered in context of the business game.

Students experience and understand - out of the point of view of managers - "handling" a company - in the field of business administration as well as in the wide range of leadership.

 

Goals:

Developing an expertise in strategic management based upon a deeper insight to

-          the necessity of developing long term planings & strategies

-          the existing interdependencies between functional areas

-          the cause and effect relationships of decision making

-          the importance of using the 'right' ratios.

 

Literature

Handout (covering the input of topics e.g. Marketing, Cost Accounting, Investment, Finance, P&L and Value Based Management).

Management of Start-ups
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-12-08
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

In context of the Business Game the student teams act as founders. They set up a small business producing and selling bicycles. During the Startup Simulation the teams have to cover all key steps: starting from set-up process, the presentation of the business idea, the preparation of a business plan up to the market introduction and the business activities.

Literature

An Introduction to Business and Business Planning, Dr. Jay A. Dewhurst, bookboon, 1st edition, 2014.

Management Basics, Susan Quinn, bookboon, 1st edition, 2010.

My Career Guide, Starting your own Business, Marjorie Mensink, bookboon, 1st edition, 2013.


Turnaround Management

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge in Business Administration; for the lecture "Turnaround Managment" knowledge on "Corporate Finance" and „International Economic Law I".

Teaching methods Lecture/seminar
Learning target
  • Extensive knowledge with regard to the stages and stage-related tasks of Turnaround Management
  • Knowledge of aspects regarding Law of Employment and Insolvency Law within the context of Turnaround Management
  • Ability to implement acquired expertise in a task- and goal-oriented way
  • Ability to perform the role as a consultant in a turnaround process
Duration 2 Semester
Hours per week 4.0
Overview
  • Classes:45 h
  • Individual/
    Group work:105 h

  • Workload:150 h
Credits and grades

Part 1: written examination (60 min)

Part 2: project thesis and presentation (Group examination is possible)

Both grades are equally weighed in the module grade.

The module grade is factored in 6/90in the final grade.

ECTS 5.0
Responsible person

Prof. Dr. Rainer Fischer

Max. participants 20
Recommended semester 1 and 2
Frequency Every sem.
Usability

The content of the module can also be used for the University's own part-time program "General Management".

Lectures Turnaround Management I
Type Seminar
Nr. IBC-07-02
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

With a very limited amount of time available the turnaround consultant is asked for a precise analysis of the company's and its market's situation emphasizing on the explanation why the company suffers from losses and / or cash drains based on facts and figures.
Therefore it`s essential to rapidly gather, evaluate and interpret all relevant data to fully understand and report the company's problems. This will lead to the answer of the main question:
Is company`s potential sufficient to overcome the crisis?

If the answer is positive the next step will be to create a master plan or blue print for the company's future starting from the strategic and managerial guidelines and developing the necessary means and measures to regain the state of profitability. To convince the various participants in the turn around process, particularly the bankers involved, this master plan has to include realistic forecasts of the company's financial future: profit & loss statement, balance sheet, and detailed forecast of the future cash flow plan, which is of special interest for calculating the amount of fresh money which required.

Usually, the consultant is also asked to support the implementation of the master plan and/or to control the restructuring process with regular reports to the banks.
If the company cannot survive exit strategies have to be developped: sale of the activity or even bankruptcy in its different forms.

All these steps will be discussed in detail based on real cases. Additionally it will be illustrated in which `way` the consultant has to cooperate with all participants involved e.g. banks, stake-holders, trade unions, creditors.

Literature

Harvard Business Review on Turnarounds (WD 706A) 2001.

Arpi, Bo International Turnaround Management, McMillan 1999. (WD 703).

Gilson, Stuart C., Creating Value Through Corporate Restructuring: Case Studies in Bankruptcies, Buyouts, Breakups, in John Wiley Sons, 2001.

Donaldson, Gordon, Corporate Restructuring: Managing the Change Process from Within; Harvard Business School Press, 1994.

International Economic Law I
Type Lecture
Nr. IBC-07-01
Hours per week 2.0
Lecture contents

Principles of Economic Law and Contract Law:

  • Introduction to International Economic Law
  • Contract Law in Germany, England and the USA
  • Security Rights

Company Law:

  • Company Law in Germany, England and the USA
  • Formation and Institutions of the German Stock Corporation, the German Private Limited Corporation, the English Public Limited Company, the English Private Limited Company, and the US Public Corporation
  • Company Law in Asia, e.g. in the Peoples Republic of China and in Japan

Insolvency Law:

  • Insolvency Law in Germany, England, and the USA
  • Insolvency Proceedings and Insolvency Plan
Literature

B. Sharon Byrd, Law & Language of Contracts and Torts, Munich 1998.

Nigel Foster / Satish Sule, German Legal System and Laws, 3. Edition, New York 2002.

Francis Lyall, An Introduction to British Law, Baden-Baden 1994.

Peter Hay, Law of the United States, Munich 2002.

Hannes Schneider / Martin Heidenhain, The German Stock Corporation Act - Bilingual Edition with an Introduction to the Law, Munich 2000.

Klaus J. Müller, The GmbH, Munich 2006.



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